Tag Archives: Clayton Homes

Berkshire Hathaway’s Clayton Homes Acquires Richmond, Virginia-Based Home Builder

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Berkshire Hathaway’s Clayton Homes has added to the rapidly growing number of site-built homes companies that it owns with the acquisition of Richmond, Virginia-based CraftMaster Homes.

On July 1, Clayton’s Clayton Properties Group used its South Carolina-based Mungo Homes to acquire CraftMaster Homes. CraftMaster Homes is Clayton’s first site-builder in Virginia.

The company is headed by Jeff Tunstall, who has been building homes in the Richmond-area for the past twenty years and will be staying with the company.

“We are thrilled to align CraftMaster Homes with a company who shares our values and drive to create an enjoyable customer experience,” Tunstall said. “This opportunity will allow us to grow our team and our footprint in the Richmond housing market. We take pride in the homes we build and the lives we touch, and we are excited to be able to reach even further with our partnership with Mungo Homes.”

“The partnership with Clayton has given us this opportunity to grow,” Steven Mungo, CEO of Mungo Homes notes. “The joining of CraftMaster Homes and Mungo Homes creates tremendous synergy and adds a strategic location to the Mungo footprint. We are excited to work together, to learn from one another, and to serve the housing needs of the Richmond area for years to come.”

Mungo Homes itself was acquired by Clayton Homes in 2018, and Clayton has been moving aggressively to add site-builders to its subsidiary Clayton Properties Group. CraftMaster Homes is its 13th acquisition since it began acquiring companies in 2015.

Acquired by Berkshire Hathaway in 2003 for $1.7 billion, Clayton Homes has grown into a diverse builder offering traditional site-built homes, modular homes, manufactured homes, tiny homes, college dormitories, military barracks and apartments.

© 2021 David Mazor

Disclosure: David Mazor is a freelance writer focusing on Berkshire Hathaway. The author is long in Berkshire Hathaway, and this article is not a recommendation on whether to buy or sell the stock. The information contained in this article should not be construed as personalized or individualized investment advice. Past performance is no guarantee of future results.

Clayton Homes Acquires Alabama Site-Builder Legacy Homes

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Berkshire Hathaway’s Clayton Homes has once again expanded its footprint in the site-built homes market with the acquisition of a site-building company in Huntsville, Alabama.

In June, Clayton’s Goodall Homes, a major site-builder in Nashville, Tennessee, acquired Legacy Homes, the largest private homebuilder in the Huntsville market, including Huntsville, Athens, New Market, Meridianville, and Monrovia.

Legacy Homes is constructing over 400 homes in 2021, and has built over 1,500 homes since the company’s founding in 2013.

The addition of Legacy Homes will allow Goodall Homes to continue to expand its new home footprint in North Alabama.

The current Legacy Homes leadership team will retain their roles within the company, with Jeff Korotky continuing in the role of division president.

Combined, the four principals of Legacy Homes – Korotky, Mark Hunter, Shawn Fairburn and Dan Nash – have more than 100 years of experience in the home building industry.

“The Legacy Homes team is thrilled to be a part of the Goodall family and looks forward to continuing our commitment to excellence with a group that values culture, character and integrity, and makes customer experience a top priority,” Jeff Korotky said.

Legacy Homes is the twelfth site-builder that Clayton Homes has acquired since it first started adding site-builders in 2016.

Acquired by Berkshire Hathaway in 2003 for $1.7 billion, Clayton Homes has grown into a diverse builder offering traditional site-built homes, modular homes, manufactured homes, tiny homes, college dormitories, military barracks and apartments.

© 2021 David Mazor

Disclosure: David Mazor is a freelance writer focusing on Berkshire Hathaway. The author is long in Berkshire Hathaway, and this article is not a recommendation on whether to buy or sell the stock. The information contained in this article should not be construed as personalized or individualized investment advice. Past performance is no guarantee of future results.

Clayton Homes Subsidiary Arbor Homes Acquires R&R Plumbing

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Clayton Homes subsidiary Arbor Homes has acquired R&R Plumbing Inc. in a deal that closed July 1.

Financial terms were not disclosed.

Former owner Dick Poynter, who founded R&R in 1989, will remain as president and continue daily management of the operations. R&R has more than 90 employees.

“On behalf of the entire R&R Plumbing community, we are honored to join the Arbor Homes team and look forward to doing our part in providing high-quality affordable housing to central Indiana for many years to come,” Poynter said.

Founded in 1994, Arbor Homes was acquired in July 2018 by Berkshire Hathaway’s Clayton Properties Group Inc., a division of Berkshire Hathaway.

The R&R acquisition is the second for Arbor since it became part of Clayton Properties.

In December 2020, the company acquired Franklin-based Fisher Contracting, a land development company.

Arbor filed 1,372 single-family building permits in 2020, up from 1,188 the previous year. It has built more than 14,000 new homes in the Indianapolis area since its founding in 1994.

“We are excited to welcome this like-minded company into the Arbor Homes family,” Pete Logan, chief operating officer for Arbor said in written rcoook. “This partnership will help expand our mission of building great neighborhoods and homes for people across the state, where they can fully experience and celebrate life.”

Acquired by Berkshire Hathaway in 2003 for $1.7 billion, Clayton Homes has grown into a diverse builder offering traditional site built homes, modular homes, manufactured homes, tiny homes, college dormitories, military barracks and apartments.

© 2021 David Mazor

Disclosure: David Mazor is a freelance writer focusing on Berkshire Hathaway. The author is long in Berkshire Hathaway, and this article is not a recommendation on whether to buy or sell the stock. The information contained in this article should not be construed as personalized or individualized investment advice. Past performance is no guarantee of future results.

Clayton Homes Acquires Its 11th Site-Builder Company

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Berkshire Hathaway’s Clayton Homes has continued to expand its footprint in the site-built homes market with the acquisition of a site-building company in the Boise, Idaho metro area.

Summit Homes, a subsidiary of Berkshire’s Clayton Properties Group, has acquired Berkeley Building Co., a top residential home builder and developer based in Meridian, Idaho. The acquisition took place on May 3.

Berkeley will continue to operate under the Berkeley Building Co. brand name in its current new home communities in Boise metro, with Joe Atalla, Founder, overseeing operations. Heather Atalla will continue as Berkeley’s Founder/CFO and Jenna Englund will maintain her role as President of Berkeley, as well as the other members of their team. The addition of Berkeley will allow Summit to expand its new home footprint into Idaho as well as provide an entry into the Boise new home market.

“We are thrilled to expand into the Boise market and welcome Berkeley to the Summit family,” said Fred Delibero, CEO of Summit Homes. “It was clear that both companies share very similar core values and cultural alignment. We are both focused on providing a high-level of customer experience to our new home buyers.”

Joe Atalla launched Berkeley Building Co. in 2008 in Boise, Idaho. Berkeley currently builds in seven new home communities in the Boise market. The new home builder is also known for its commitment to charitable giving and has been a longtime supporter of St. Jude Research Hospital through its building of the St. Jude Dream Home for over a decade.

“We are excited for the opportunity to not only partner with Summit Homes and join Clayton Properties Group, but to also join the Berkshire Hathaway family,” said Joe Atalla. “Joining forces just makes sense as we are all working toward common goals: to provide a first-class homebuilding experience and provide extraordinary resources to our team members to grow and develop, both of which will be enhanced through this partnership.”

“Berkeley’s success as a builder is an impressive testament to their passion, talent and values. They have developed an outstanding team that builds exceptional homes while upholding the experience as their top priority,” said Delibero. “We could not be more excited about the future and the opportunities this will bring our buyers and team members.”

Berkeley Building Co. is the eleventh site-builder that Clayton Homes has acquired since it first started adding site-builders in 2016.

Acquired by Berkshire Hathaway in 2003 for $1.7 billion, Clayton Homes has grown into a diverse builder offering traditional site-built homes, modular homes, manufactured homes, tiny homes, college dormitories, military barracks and apartments.

© 2021 David Mazor

Disclosure: David Mazor is a freelance writer focusing on Berkshire Hathaway. The author is long in Berkshire Hathaway, and this article is not a recommendation on whether to buy or sell the stock. The information contained in this article should not be construed as personalized or individualized investment advice. Past performance is no guarantee

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Berkshire Hathaway’s Clayton Homes will build 300 to 350 site-built homes on a former estate in Pfafftown, North Carolina.

The 184-acre former estate of Eldridge “Redge” and Jane Hanes was sold to Clayton Homes for $4.5 million and will be developed by Clayton’s Mungo Homes division, and marketed under the Shugart Homes brand.

Mungo Homes was acquired by Clayton Homes in 2018, and Shugart Homes was acquired by Clayton in 2019.

The manor house will be demolished, however, a guest/boat house that sits at the 22-acre lake on the property will be refurbished.

Berkshire’s Clayton Homes, which is the largest producer of manufactured homes, has been moving aggressively into the site-built market, and is already among the top-ten site-builders in the U.S.

Clayton Homes has acquired ten site-built companies since it first started adding site-builders in 2016.

Acquired by Berkshire Hathaway in 2003 for $1.7 billion, Clayton Homes has grown into a diverse builder offering traditional site-built homes, modular homes, manufactured homes, tiny homes, college dormitories, military barracks and apartments.

Read a Special Report on how Kevin Clayton has transformed Clayton Homes.

© 2021 David Mazor

Disclosure: David Mazor is a freelance writer focusing on Berkshire Hathaway. The author is long in Berkshire Hathaway, and this article is not a recommendation on whether to buy or sell the stock. The information contained in this article should not be construed as personalized or individualized investment advice. Past performance is no guarantee of future results.

Clayton Goes Solar to Power Texas Facility

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Berkshire Hathaway’s Clayton, a Tennessee-based home builder of site-built and off-site built homes, has installed its first 200 kilowatt solar carport system at its Clayton Sulphur Springs home building facility in Texas.

The system was installed by Solar One, and will allow the company to offset 30 to 40 percent of the facility’s on-demand electricity use with renewable energy, while providing shade for its team members’ vehicles.

“Our new solar carport system not only serves as a cost savings tool but also as a pivotal example of Clayton’s commitment to sustainable building and innovation,” said Gavin Mabe, director of engineering and technology at Clayton. “Our team is very proud to further promote our national green building initiative by creating clean renewable energy that our facility will use to build hundreds of homes every year.”

The new solar power system has the potential to help Clayton Sulphur Springs’ team save just over $24,000 per year in energy costs. To enhance the company’s team member experience, the solar panels were installed in the parking lot to provide shade for team member vehicles and ensure a safer ground location for long-term maintenance of the solar carport system.

“We hope this new solar panel system will serve as a test for further renewable energy enhancements across Clayton,” said Don McCann, general manager of Clayton Sulphur Springs. “Our company is dedicated to tapping smarter, sustainable energy sources and innovative technology to create a cleaner building process for our Clayton Built® homes.”

The solar carport installation is part of ongoing efforts to utilize sustainable building and innovation practices at Clayton. The Clayton Sulphur Springs facility, along with all 40 Clayton off-site home building facilities around the nation, have earned ISO (International Organization for Standardization) 14001 registration for their sustainable building practices. This highly regarded registration helps ensure that sustainable building guidelines are implemented to promote green practices that increase recycling, reduce energy use and decrease landfill waste.

© 2020 David Mazor

Disclosure: David Mazor is a freelance writer focusing on Berkshire Hathaway. The author is long in Berkshire Hathaway, and this article is not a recommendation on whether to buy or sell the stock. The information contained in this article should not be construed as personalized or individualized investment advice. Past performance is no guarantee of future results.

Clayton Homes Acquires Ninth Site Builder

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Berkshire Hathaway’s Clayton Homes, the leading builder of manufactured homes, is quickly becoming a big player in the site built home business. Clayton has acquired Highland Homes, a Florida home builder that is the ninth home builder acquired by Clayton in just three years.

In its 23rd year, Highland, which is based in Lakeland, Florida, is headed by the father and son team, Bob and Joel Adams. Both will be staying on to run the company under Clayton.

The builder will join Clayton Properties Group, a division of Clayton Home Building Group that is based in Maryville, Tennessee.

Highland’s focus is on the low and midprice market, which fits with Clayton’s market approach for its site built homes.

“We are thrilled to join Clayton Properties Group’s family of builders,” said Joel Adams, Highland Homes’ executive vice president, in the statement. “The partnership with Clayton opens up tremendous opportunity for our team members to continue our focus on building high-quality, affordable homes in Central Florida with a strong emphasis on customer experience and market growth.”

Ranked 75th on the 2018 Builder Magazine’s Builder 100 list, Highland built 800 homes in 2018, and is aiming to construct 980 in 2019.

© 2019 David Mazor

Disclosure: David Mazor is a freelance writer focusing on Berkshire Hathaway. The author is long in Berkshire Hathaway, and this article is not a recommendation on whether to buy or sell the stock. The information contained in this article should not be construed as personalized or individualized investment advice. Past performance is no guarantee of future results.

Special Report: Kevin Clayton Transforms Clayton Homes

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“Would you believe where we are after just three years,” Kevin Clayton, president and CEO of Clayton Homes, says about the company’s move into the site builder business.

It’s a business that Clayton is growing rapidly, and he just acquired Highland Homes in early May, a Florida home builder that is the ninth home builder acquired by Clayton in just three years.

It’s all part of an increasing emphasis on site built homes for the low and midprice market, notes Kevin Clayton.

“It’s a market that has an average price point of $318,000, Clayton says, “which is well under the national average of over $400,000.”

Clayton Homes, which runs its site builders under its Clayton Properties Group, a division of Clayton Home Building Group that is based in Maryville, Tennessee, is already ranked 18th on Builder Magazine’s Builder 100 list and rising fast.

Clayton Homes has been named “Builder of the year” for 2019. It’s an award that really pleases Kevin Clayton.

“To think we weren’t even in that business three years ago,” Clayton says proudly.

Clayton is looking to acquire more site builders, but notes they must meet four criteria.

“First, the owner must be willing to stay around and work,” Clayton says. “Second, they must have survived the last recession; third, they must focus on building low and midprice houses, and fourth, but not least, they must be customer focused and really care about the customer experience.”

Clayton Homes was founded in 1956, by Kevin Clayton’s father Jim Clayton, and Kevin Clayton has led the company since 1999, when he took over from his father.

Acquired by Berkshire Hathaway in 2003 for $1.7 billion, Clayton Homes has grown into a diverse builder offering traditional site built homes, modular homes, manufactured homes, tiny homes, college dormitories, military barracks and apartments.

Improvement in Manufactured Homes

Kevin Clayton is also positive about his manufactured homes business, which he emphasis use the same 30-year shingles as a traditional site built home.

“We don’t have metal roofs anymore,” Clayton says. “Our manufactured homes have a lifespan that’s the same as a site built home.”

Clayton is also building a new type of manufactured homes, for now dubbed New Class Homes, which meet Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac standards. By qualifying, borrowers have lower down payment requirements and lender fees. The homes qualify for a MH Advantage loan, and must be “designed to meet specific construction, architectural design and energy efficiency standards,” according to Fannie Mae.

The move dramatically reduces the amount of down payment borrowers have to come up with. MH Advantage loans require a 3 % down payment, down from 5% previously. In addition, Fannie Mae does not charge its 50-basis-point loan-level price adjustment for manufactured housing loans.

“New Class Homes represent only a couple of percent of our revenues right now,” Kevin Clayton says, but he sees lots of rooms for growth.

The overall manufactured home business is strong.

“The manufactured home business is up 6-7 percent this year,” Clayton says.

Clayton emphasized the environmental advantages manufactured homes, which produce far less waste than traditional site built homes.

“All our 42 facilities are ISO 14001 certified, which is all about environmental standards,” Clayton says.

ISO 14001 is the international standard that specifies requirements for an effective environmental management system.

Clayton has moved much of its supply chain in-house, building more of its own components.

“We build our own windows,” Clayton notes.

Why Consumers Buy Manufactured Homes

It’s a type of housing that opens home ownership to a broad range of consumers that are locked out of housing market as traditional home prices have skyrocketed.

“Fifty percent of people we help with a home would not qualify for Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac mortgages,” Clayton says.

A big part of that access to homes is the greatly lower price point. A manufactured home can be purchased for $69,000 and has an average cost of only $116,000 with land.

“In rural America there’s not a lot of apartment options,” Kevin Clayton notes. “Many of our customers have been living with family, and are looking for an affordable way to live on their own.”

Clayton especially notes the popularity of manufactured homes for five-acre ranches.

“Where there’s land, we shine!”

© 2019 David Mazor

Disclosure: David Mazor is a freelance writer focusing on Berkshire Hathaway. The author is long in Berkshire Hathaway, and this article is not a recommendation on whether to buy or sell the stock. The information contained in this article should not be construed as personalized or individualized investment advice. Past performance is no guarantee of future results.

Clayton Homes Launches Major TV Campaign

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According to a study by Home.com, seven out of ten non-home-owning Millenials think they will never be able to afford buying a home.

Berkshire Hathaway’s Clayton, one of the largest home builders in the nation, is clearly out to counter that notion. The home builder has launched a new television advertising campaign which takes aim at showcasing the modern prefab home and educating the public about the benefits of off-site construction.

With the average price of a new site-built home with land in 2018 nearing $400,000 according to the U.S. Census Bureau, prefab homes offer an attainable solution starting under $200,000 in most markets plus cost of land.

Called “Prefabulous”, the campaign is part of Clayton’s mission to elevate the manufactured housing industry and challenge the outdated myths that create misconceptions around this innovative, efficient construction method.

The commercial takes the viewer inside the set of a home building facility and follows a family through a beautiful Clayton Built® home as it’s being constructed, highlighting high-end features and modern design.

“Homes built off-site offer higher quality, more value and a smart solution to the affordable housing crisis in America,” said Kevin Clayton, CEO of Clayton. “This campaign was created to help more families realize they can attain a beautiful, quality home without sacrificing modern amenities. Off-site construction can make the dream of homeownership a reality by leveraging innovative building practices, automation and bulk purchasing power.”

Every Clayton Built® home is built inside an ISO 14001 certified facility, away from the damage and delays that can be caused by rain and seasonal weather. Construction cost savings are achieved by purchasing building material and name-brand appliances in bulk and utilizing economies of scale.

Off-site building efficiencies, production line like assembly and material recycling also aid in reducing the waste and cost of construction.

Off-site construction is uniquely positioned to provide access to quality housing at a variety of income levels. Available prefab home features:
• Permanent foundation with porch
• Open floor plan concept
• Upgraded all-wood cabinets and farmhouse sink
• ecobee3 lite smart thermostat and energy efficient appliances
• Wide plank flooring and drywall interior

“Clayton is uniquely positioned to bridge the affordability gap using both on-site and off-site home construction methods,” said Clayton. “Our goal as a company and industry is to democratize luxury and provide attainable homeownership for all families.”

© 2019 David Mazor


Disclosure: David Mazor is a freelance writer focusing on Berkshire Hathaway. The author is long in Berkshire Hathaway, and this article is not a recommendation on whether to buy or sell the stock. The information contained in this article should not be construed as personalized or individualized investment advice. Past performance is no guarantee of future results.

Clayton Homes Jumps into Tiny Home Market

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Berkshire Hathaway’s Clayton, one of the largest home builders in America, is unveiling the Saltbox floor plan, the second addition to its Designer Series by Clayton Tiny Homes.

Clayton first introduced the Low Country, the first tiny home floor plan in the Designer Series, in person at the annual 2017 Berkshire Hathaway Shareholders meeting. Designed by renowned architect Jeffrey Dungan, the Saltbox is designed to be a perfect year-round permanent residence, vacation home, guest home, or accessory dwelling unit.

“We continue to push ourselves to design and innovate with our customers’ unique lifestyles in mind,” Clayton CEO Kevin Clayton said. “The Saltbox is the perfect tiny home for those looking to live simply, but luxuriously.

Built indoors to International Residential Code (IRC) building standards, the Saltbox home is a “tiny” modular home constructed to be permanently affixed to the homeowner’s property. The Clayton Built® tiny home possesses all the latest in modern home design, both inside and out. Ply Gem® French doors; a white Summit Appliance® range and refrigerator; and tall, 9’5″ ceilings in the bedroom provide a roomy living space inside. On the outside, the premium standing seam metal roof, stylish vertical shiplap wood siding with horizontal board and batten are combined to provide a high-quality exterior that are both stylish and built to last.

“We’ve packed a lot into this well-appointed 452-square-foot home,” Jim Greer, Clayton Tiny Homes Brand Manager, said. “But we know that size doesn’t matter when it comes to designing smart and luxurious spaces. From the 270-degree views to the quartz countertops, this is the home for comfort and style.”

The Saltbox also utilizes several features that allow it to be an efficient home. Energy-efficient Ply Gem® aluminum clad windows and doors as well as a space-saving tankless water heater give Saltbox owners ways to minimize utility consumption.

Though the floor plan is compact, homeowners of the Saltbox won’t have to sacrifice having friends over or entertaining. The home is designed to fit a dining room table that seats six, and a covered porch with large overhang means homeowners can utilize outdoor living spaces during different weather conditions.

© 2018 David Mazor

Disclosure: David Mazor is a freelance writer focusing on Berkshire Hathaway. The author is long in Berkshire Hathaway, and this article is not a recommendation on whether to buy or sell the stock. The information contained in this article should not be construed as personalized or individualized investment advice. Past performance is no guarantee of future results.